Power plants are industrial facilities used to generate electric power with the help of one or more generators which convert different energy sources into electric power. Power plants need to monitor emissions continuously according to local emission regulations. Read about our solutions for the power industry!

Conventional and Non-Conventional Power Plants

The heat sources used in power plants vary from traditional fossil fuels to renewables. Power plants can be divided into two categories – conventional and non-conventional power plants – based on their source of energy. We focus on conventional power plants as non-conventional power plants (hydro, geothermal, biomass, solar and wind power plants) generate renewable electricity producing little or no emissions.

Conventional power plants are:

  • Fossil fuel power plants: Generates electric power by burning fossil fuels like coal, natural gas or diesel.
  • Nuclear power plants: Controlled nuclear reaction is maintained to generate electricity.
  • Hydroelectric power plants: Electricity is produced by building dams on suitable rivers.

Each power plant technology has advantages and disadvantages. For example, fossil fuel power plants deliver on-demand, consistent and reliable energy when the resources are available. On the other hand, the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, gas, and oil, produces emissions.

LCP BREF – Regulated Emissions Monitoring

Depending on the used fuel and implemented reduction systems, the flue gas emissions generally include carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOX), dust and mercury (Hg). Power plants need to monitor these emissions continuously according to local emission regulations.

Members of the European Union accepted new air pollution limits for large combustion plants in April 2017. Different variations of conventional power plants used for mechanical power and heat generation are covered in the Best Available Techniques Conclusions for Large Combustion Plants
(LCP BREF) document. The LCP BREF includes new emission limits values (ELVs) for sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), mercury, and particulate matter, and requires large thermal power plants in Europe to comply with those limits by 2021.

New continuous measurement requirements presented in the LCP BREF document include ammonia NH3, when selective catalytic reduction SCR and/or selective non-catalytic reduction SNCR is used. Download our LCP BREF Guide.

Our Solution: Monitoring Systems for Demanding Measurements

Both of our continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are certified systems designed for demanding emission monitoring measurements.

The Continuous Emissions Monitoring System CEMS II e offers TÜV and MCERTS certified solution (QAL1) for a wide range of demanding emission monitoring applications. The CEMS II e system utilizes Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy FTIR technology. CEMS II e can also be equipped with a ZrO2 oxygen analyzer which is designed for continuous oxygen measurement of wet or dry flue gas. Gasmet CEMS II e is generally used to simultaneously measure the following 16 gases: H2O, CO2, CO, N2O, NO, NO2, SO2, HCl, HF, NH3, CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4 and CH2O.

The Continuous Mercury Monitoring system CMM has the lowest certified range in the world (0-5 µg/m3) and is TÜV and MCERTS certified solution (QAL1) for measuring mercury continuously from hot, wet and corrosive gas streams. The CMM system utilizes Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence (CVAF) technology.

Why choose Gasmet as your CEMS partner?

Gasmet is an ideal partner for the power industry. Our solutions have proven their applicability in all areas of the power generation process, from material flow to pollution control to emissions monitoring. Here are the top 5 reasons why you should choose us as your CEMS partner:

  • Reduce risks with equipment that satisfy all regulatory requirements
  • Save money with minimal maintenance, operational costs and calibration
  • Gain longevity of investment with long lifetime expectancy
  • Future-proof your investment. With Gasmet FTIR, if there are additional requirements, new compounds can be added to the measurement setup without costly hardware changes.
  • Gasmet has a reputation for providing analytical expertise, supplying quality products and services

Note:

In 2017, Best Available Techniques Conclusions for Large Combustion Plants (LCP BREF) was published. The document specifies new measuring requirements and emission limits for LCPs with a total rated thermal input exceeding 50MW. Gasmet has made a summary of the document: Changes and New Methods in Emission Monitoring and Control in Accordance with LCP BREF 2017

GUIDE

What you need to know about emissions monitoring

In this guide we will introduce you to Emissions Monitoring and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) in emissions monitoring. We will also explain what needs to be taken into consideration in an effective set-up for emissions monitoring and present real-life example data measured with Gasmet CEMS II e and CMM. Increase your Emissions Monitoring knowledge by downloading the guide free of charge!

DOWNLOAD EMISSIONS MONITORING GUIDE

Case: Thetford Power Station

“We originally purchased the portable Gasmet DX4000 analysers as a an emergency back-up unit, but the core measurement components of a DX4000 are exactly the same as the Gasmet CEMS, so it made sense to run both analysers simultaneously so that we always had a ‘hot’ back-up.” says EPR Group Environmental Manager Kevin Williams

Read full case study ❯

See also

Waste Incineration
Cement Production
Raw Gas Measurements
Compliance Measurements
Aluminum Production
Fertilizer and Nitric Acid Production